News . Events SUSTAINABILITY – Citizenship and partnership for a better city

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“CARE” Phase: Students brought up themes such as combating COVID; recycling; conservation of city gardens; care for local squares, and the most popular topic was the Lago de Olarias, a public park recently inaugurated in the city, which has brought much development to the lake area. It is a project still in development and has caught the children’s attention for the care and development of the city. Real-life problems were discussed in groups, where students could contribute ideas and knowledge they brought from home, through the discussions they had with their families. They contributed historical facts, family memories, and many different knowledges. This caught the attention of students who brought other subjects. The fact that the lake is a new place in the city and is still in development, drew even more attention from the students. They were interested in understanding how they could contribute to the care of the place. The students who participated in the activities were from 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades of the early years of Elementary Education. Approximately 230 students.

“KNOW” Phase: Students used their knowledge about pollution, watersheds, groundwater, riparian forests, relief, sustainability, recycling, citizenship, among others. The most interesting stages were the initial discussion; preparing questions for the specialists and for a lecture with the former mayor who inaugurated the place; visiting the site and developing hypotheses to solve the problem of stream pollution.

“DO” Phase: In the end, students prepared a community awareness campaign about the source of the waters feeding the city’s main lake. They developed pamphlets and videos with messages of care and social responsibility. The activities were completed in groups and supported by the school and social community, such as local volunteers, politicians, among others.

Findings related to the Open Schooling approach: The activity used the open scenario method, conducted according to the responses that came from the participants. The curriculum was relevant and engaging, and teachers felt challenged, as they needed to acquire knowledge as doubts and questions arose. Open schooling can be very useful for other teachers because it expands the school curriculum, brings lightness and reality to the presented content, brings information and support for the continuous training of teachers, and makes 21st Century Education happen in the classroom.

Students’ outcomes: The students’ results showed involvement and interest throughout the project, including proposing new problems and developing projects that will become annual projects in our school environment. Talking about pollution and water distribution brought an interest in energy consumption, renewable and non-renewable sources, and a general sense of responsibility for the school community. For example, one student mentioned, “how good it is to be in a school that cares and helps us make a difference in our local community.”

News . Events Visual thinking and illustrated mind maps as tools for visualizing the profile of a vulnerable Community.

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Care: Students were engaged with the possibility of using drawing and art to visualize real-life problems and discuss the best places to play in and explore their local environment. The 20 students who participated in the activities were between the ages of 10 and 14 and attended local public schools in the morning, while studying at the NGO during the afternoon.

 

Know: The students used their knowledge of visual thinking exercises, perspective, character development and model sheets, 3D and volumetry aspects, coloring, discussion, and collaboration to develop a collective mural of art and storytelling, exploring the historical local problem of a polluted river.

 

Do: At the end of the initiative, the students prepared Illustrated Mind Maps to record points of personal interest and created two Art Murals to express and share their ideas. One of the murals registered their “vision” and dreams, while the other one visualized data/actions and places in the city and community. We believe that science and scientific problems should be integrated and visualized with easy comprehension for vulnerable persons living in complex scenarios. The activities were completed in groups with support from three professors and an employee from the cleaning department.

 

Findings related to the Open Schooling approach: This activity was not part of the curriculum, but it was so relevant in integrating university students and professors with vulnerable communities, with a focus on visualizing a problem and sharing a vision of the future. Open schooling might be helpful for other teachers because it can provide a collaborative, not expensive, and co-creative process to facilitate explaining complex content for vulnerable communities, visualizing data, drawing projects, registering a system of ideas, and sensitizing persons to become changemakers.

 

Students’ outcomes: The students were involved in art and Paulo Freire’s cultural cycle, discussions to discover local themes, and enjoyed the process. After three weeks, I observed that they were more self-confident in the process, with me as a “researcher,” and with our common purpose. For example, a student mentioned the very hard moments that they lived with their families and local crimes, as well as the difficulty of playing or even being close to the river because it was always dirty and polluted, and there were not many good places to play near the school/NGO. I believe that this gathering of feelings and opinions, especially from children living in vulnerable scenarios, is an opportunity to listen to real problems and integrate the university into society. Therefore, the outcome is deeper than just the method or even this lived experience. For the students, this constant exchange can amplify their vision of the world and provide possibilities to change difficulties.

News . Events Scientific action in the Environmental Protection of the Tramandaí River in Rio Grande do Sul: Students develop research and communication skills for responsible innovation

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CARE: A project plan was proposed by a school teacher for students to identify a local problem. A group of four students from 17 to 18 years – the third year of secondary school at the Federal Institute of Rio Grande do Sul, Osório Campus, Technical Course in Administration, found a piece of news in the newspaper about the construction of a bridge being a threat to the cooperative fishing community carried out by the porpoises (similar to dolphins).

The construction of the bridge in an inappropriate place is a threat to the porpoises, and may lead to their extinction.  The construction of the base of the bridge, that is, of the pillars to sustain it within the river, tends to lead to increased pollution and noise in the bar changing the natural habitat of marine animals.

The students were engaged and interested in researching and seeking socio-scientific solutions, including ways of raising awareness among the local population and tourists. The research began with the question of students seeking to find out if the construction of the new bridge would affect the natural and community habitat, as well as how this could occur.  In addition to the initial group composed of four students, the interaction of this discussion was shared with twelve other students of the class divided into three more groups. Thus, four main problems were identified: i) the threat of fishing cooperative; ii) sewage treatment in the city of Tramandaí, because the city does not have the entire sewage network, only in the center; iii) pollution in Lagoa do Marcelino; iv) disposal of plastic in the city of Osório.

Knowledge: Students used knowledge about ecology for environmental preservation in the locality where they live.  The skills that the students practiced were: elaborating scientific questions; researching scientific articles; interviewing scientists and public officials; examining the consequences of environmental impacts; estimating the risks of building the bridge for the region’s ecosystem; analyzing the percentage of the impacted population; estimating the pros and cons of building the bridge to justify their opinion; using ethics to reflect on the impact of the new bridge on the fishermen’s work; communicating their ideas from the creation of digital folders.

Do: In the end, students prepared digital information folders to be shared on social networks. They completed the activities by sharing a discussion on the topic and the results of the research in a large group. In addition, they also addressed scientific issues with their families and the local community to promote awareness and new knowledge.

Findings related to the Open Schooling approach: The activity was adapted to the curriculum and proved relevant, as it provided an opportunity for students to seek solutions to problems in their locality. In this practice, through scientific research, the students presented justifications to support their opinion and combat real problems.  Open schooling can be useful for other teachers through integrative and interdisciplinary projects, which can also seek the solution of local problems in search of sustainable development.

Student results: Students demonstrated great results in terms of their involvement, pleasure, and trust in science. As an example, one student mentioned “that he learned a lot about the region’s ecosystem and circular economy.”  Another student stressed “the importance of promoting sustainable development by supporting the local fishing community and ensuring the region’s fish with the protection of the river.”  In general, the importance of talking to families was highlighted in order to better understand the importance of sustainable fishing for the region.

Find out more here: Our report. 

 

News . Events Protecting the animals of the largest urban forest of the world – From Genuity to Geniality in Early Childhood Education with open schooling

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“CARE”: Approximately 650 students from Early Years Education, Elementary School, and Low Primary Education engaged in investigating a theme of their interest: the animals. They were concerned about those animals they found in their city, and even in their backyard, which were injured or lost from their natural habitat. Their interests engaged them in several activities involving the project. Many of them were led by their natural curiosity expressed in various questions addressed to the science professionals, and also in the conversations with their teachers and family. They learned science through a real-life problem involving their families and experts.

“KNOW “: Students learned about animal types and classification, names, and differences, including behaviour, habits, environment and food. In addition, students not only developed skills such as asking questions, drawing, writing, reflecting on school assessment, communicating their conclusions, but also experienced discussions about the voting system and data analysis through mathematics.

“DO”: At the end, students created drawings, posters, campaigns and infographics with maths data, games, and interviews with printed and online resources. They developed the activities individually and collaboratively with experts, family, and community members. At the end, all students discussed about their views related to science in their lives and society with the self-assessment mobile application CONNECT-SCIENCE tool.

Findings related to the Open Schooling approach: The structured activity allowed a connection with the curriculum in an interdisciplinary way. Children developed knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values with activities in science, mathematics, geography, and Portuguese language communication. It was a useful, relevant, challenging, and innovative project as it involved many schools and teachers who supported the actions with great commitment. Open schooling can be useful and challenging at the same time as it requires planning actions within and beyond the school space. That is why it is critical for teachers to have opportunities to receive mentorship and training with access to easy-to-use resources, practical teaching strategies, technology support and also an assessment tool to examine the results of their practices.

Student outcomes: Students demonstrated increased engagement, enjoyment of scientific activities, such as: observation in the forest and zoo; analysis and comparison of animal data sheets; discussion of concepts; communication skills, like oral, visual, and written competencies. As an example, one student mentioned that science is important and recorded a short video at home on her cell phone expressing her views on what science means to her. By the same token, other students manifested their learning and new knowledge by stating: “Science is not just about doing experiments in the lab; it helps us think about how to help the world”; “I learned about the characteristics of forest animals, types of habitats and how to protect them; “Deforestation is increasing, and we need to do something.”

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Inquiry Mapping with design thinking to develop a school community’s agenda for the sustainable development of the Village of Tupé da Amazônia

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Caring/ Caring: The community was very receptive and interested in the proposal of open schooling. Initially, the participants were introspective, but after an initial dialogue and engaging activity for introduction, they became comfortable interacting with the researchers in an engaging way. The objectives of the open schooling activity were introduced. They joined the proposal of collective inquiry mapping based on an open schooling experience to identify the challenges and opportunities of the community to face adversities and enhance sustainability.  

Open Schooling Co-learning objectives were identified before and during the activity.  

The researchers and the community were interested in:    

  • Understanding what it is and how to do open schooling including communities from Amazonia and universities in Brazil.  
  • Identifying the important elements to continue open schooling to enhance the quality of education and in particular exploring solutions for the local issues. 
  •  Experiencing an open schooling practice for the production of an ebook “Reserva Tupé 2030”: an agenda of priorities and opportunities.  

This open schooling approach using inquiry mapping and design thinking brought together researchers and practitioners  in  the area of Education, Computer Science, and Psychology as well as community members of the Tupé community and neighboring territories  including students, teachers, school head,  parents, and local citizens.

Several real-life community issues were identified. The challenges discussed were:  

  • Secondary school is not offered in the community.  
  • Basic Education ends in Elementary School phase II, which corresponds to the ninth school year. 
  • Health service is very limited, there are no doctors and nurses.  
  • Environmental problems include: reducing waste, lack of safety, the need for water cleaning, poor or lack of sanitation, and insufficient access to energy for all community residents. 
     

Some opportunities for the outside community were also identified:  

  • The development of Ecotourism.  
  • Communication channels uniting residents, managers, educators, professionals, apprentices. 
  • Production of local products (for instance, natural repellents), jewelry, and crafts with seeds and sustainable natural resources. 
  • Alternative energy as solar energy. 
  • Open schooling providing projects with young people.  

The community raised questions concerning the objective of the study, what benefit it would bring to them, and what would be offered to the community through the partnership with open schooling. It was clarified by the residents and members of the school that the São João community receives many visitors for research, diagnosis, and promises of partnerships, but nothing happens for them. 

The co-authoring of an agenda to guide the community in research projects and future partnerships was an initiative well-received by the community. Participants have become very interested and also committed to sharing their local problems. The dialogue opened an opportunity for collaboration between them supported by local and external partners. The production of an ebook, a collective document of the challenges and opportunities of the community, resulted in a process of consolidating the partnership and initiating new proposals and projects. All community members and partners also positioned themselves as co-learners, i.e. one learning from the other. The activity included people of varying ages from Basic Education to Higher Education. 

Knowledge: Based on the issues that the community cares about, four curricular topics were identified to support the open schooling project. The local researchers from the university and local educators from the school considered it important to discuss the curriculum for students to develop knowledge with the connection between formal, non-formal, and informal education with real-life problem-solving experienced by members of the community of Tupé:    

  • Health and well-being: nutrition, local diseases (malaria, dengue, and hepatitis), tooth care.  
  • Basic infrastructure, health, river transport, sanitation, drinking water, lack of energy, poor internet connection, and regular High School system. 
  • Professional training (training linked to the production chain and sustainability-focused ecotourism, fish farming, family farming, and general services for the construction and maintenance of the basic infrastructure), local public tender vacancies prioritizing community members for greater commitment. Greater incentive and resources for education and health professionals from other communities working in Tupé. 
  • Fighting against pollution, care of the environment and biodiversity.  

The skills required: 

  • Collaboration: teamwork, internal and external communication. 
  • Digital skills: refers to the critical and creative use of local and global knowledge including the internet – reliable sources, critical thinking to detect fake news, security to enhance data protection, computational thinking for teachers and students to learn how to create, adapt and reuse APPs – applications, games, and gamification for significant development of the entire Tupé population and aggregate communities. The educational packages installed by the Municipal Department of Education (SEMED) should be expanded. The current digital resources are GCOMPRIS game packs on Linux, chess games, memory game, text editor and drawing, Google for Education package.  
  • Scientific thinking for collaborative research: refers to the process of problem-solving and innovation based on evidence-based thinking and scientific inquiry-based learning involving all representatives of Tupé society: students, teachers, managers, citizens, researchers, and local professionals. 

 

Do: Participants completed all activities: 

  • Individual diagnostic interview 
  • Discussion and mapping of diagnostic evaluation results 
  • Group conversational dynamics using research mapping and design thinking to record information needed to present the prototype 
  • Presentation of the findings of each group: challenges and opportunities 
  • Final reflection of the process and presentation of prototype/results including next steps 
  • Local visits and testimonials 
  • Agenda Review 
  • Prioritization of actions 

The next steps will be discussing the outputs integrated with key local documents and scientific literature references that will be available for the community to access from the computer laboratory. 

With the purpose of guiding the teaching and learning actions of more than 250,000 students of Manaus, through the SEMED, the new “Municipal School Curriculum” was launched in 2021, with linguistic review, diagramming and better adaptation to all, including riverside communities. 

Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kTJ0oMA6cQk83E_YAVfLzgrdr5m0WYbv/view   

Findings related to the approach of Open Schooling: The activity was based on the open scenario – inspired by active methodologies (creative and participatory) such as consensual dialogue, co-creation, investigative mapping with design thinking for communities. Open schooling was considered useful and challenging.  The agenda began with local problems and was finalized with a representative who summarised the views of the community and the value of education for the local population. Community members became more aware of local priorities and also felt more united.  “We have to thank you. Changing is not easy. We need to be strong to want, know and do.   Having regular high school in this community is not a favor, it’s a right.” 

Results for co-learning: Participants recognized that this initiative is challenging because in order to change it is necessary to have a great connection with the priorities that the community cares about, as well as knowledge to solve problems and the development of actions for overcoming local challenges. 

Education, better teaching conditions, transportation for children to get to school, access to doctors and medicines throughout the year including during periods of drought, energy and basic sanitation are some of the community rights. All these issues they were already aware of. However, a key finding was that “something must be done from the union of all members”. This evidence of open schooling can be an approach to enhance the union among the community members from them to do the change that they need based on knowledge and what they care about. This best practice shows that the cocreation of a collective agenda of priorities, challenges and opportunities was a valuable opportunity for them to share their local wisdom and updating/expanding their knowledge including the feedback that they needed and received from the researchers. This enabled them to find alternatives to reduce the barriers, uncertainties, and unknown challenges. This shows that open schooling can be a way to increase communities’ confidence for them to go ahead with their own voices and local wisdom for identifying priorities, enhancing the quality of education, and changing public policies for equality and equity.  

The results for the participants were: involvement, pleasure and trust with science and research. Some specific learning outcomes developed were: (1) becoming aware of the concept ‘open schooling’ – both meaning and procedures. (2) identifying new collaborative approaches to explore issues supported by education for democracy, for example, inquiry mapping with design thinking, (3) greater awareness of problems and opportunities for change.  

As an example, through the open schooling partnership between the school, university and community, it was identified how and who to contact; for example, the policymakers and procedures to make the request of secondary school in the community of Tupé. Another example of increasing awareness of the issues and communication skills to explore the problems and opportunities was children who voluntarily made illustrations of the problems faced and described by the adults. Using their drawings they prioritised the transportation for everyone to get to school and also the need for greater opportunities to learn outside of school, for example, with family members at home and during the transportation to the school because the boat trip from home to school is a long journey for students who live further away. 

The transport from Manaus to the Community takes about 45 minutes by speedboat but a couple of hours by normal boat.  

Because of the drought it is necessary to walk a long distance under the hot weather to get to the school. 

The school has a computer room and a library in the same space., only 1 room with air conditioner and unstable electricity  

It is the only room with air conditioning but with limited use because of the power outage. The internet “low” connection is also limited. To ventilate, the door is then kept open. 

 One of the  open schooling teams including participants of all ages. 

The result was very positive with involvement, significance and engagement. 

 Photographs taken by the community and CONNECT representative Tayanne Grazielle S. Rodrigues 

News . Events The Bird Refaunation Project of the Northeastern Semiarid of Brazil (Best Practice – Brazil)

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CARE: The Bird Refaunation Project of the Northeastern Semiarid of Brazil consisted of the analysis of the Phyto physiognomy of the caatinga in urban spaces, a practical study; Identification of caged birds in the city of Irecê; Exhibition of the study carried out at the event open to the community, entitled Knowledge Fair; Awareness campaign on the theme addressed in a public square in the neighborhood where the school is located. The focus of the research is to answer the following question: how can the collaborative scientific partnership be co-evaluated by those involved in open schooling for the conception and implementation of curriculum plans in public schools of basic education? 

KNOW: The study identified relevant scenarios and collaborative scientific actions to prepare young students to understand the problems of the natural environment caused by man and their consequences for the balance of the planet. The trafficking of wild animals, capture, marketing, and captivity of songbirds was chosen, because it has a strong impact on the environmental balance. The illegal transport, death and mistreatment of the birds that are the majority, many extinct and or threatened with extinction. Aim to show people how understanding the bird’s habit, the contributions given by them to the wild life. This project will help all the members of the group and thus they will all acquire more knowledge in the area. 

DO:  Activities were developed that were very significant, I can mention: 

  • analysis of the Phyto physiognomy of the caatinga in the urban environment of the city of Irecê so that we could study the issue of the bird fauna existing in the environment;
  • analysis and study, carried out by the students of the ACM school on the birds, of the bird type, found in the caatinga biome and subsequent diagnosis of their existence in the urban environment in the city of Irecê, Bahia.
  • identification of bird-type birds used in cages in domestic environments in the city of Irecê, Bahia.
  • Decision making on the importance of raising awareness in the school community through an information campaign in the neighborhood where the school is located.
  • Conducting an awareness campaign for the school community in a public square. saw. Presentation of the project at the Knowledge Fair explaining the stages of the research to the entire school community

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. The students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families, and it was remarkable how much they didn’t know the subject, at the same time they wanted to learn. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful in this controversial topic during the pandemic, and as the school offers teaching by areas of knowledge, it facilitated the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities targeting technological resources and curricular interaction through of projects. 

OUTCOMES: In general, students participated and interacted in learning activities with an interest in learning and discovering curiosities about science. Several students did not know the main scientists and their contributions to planetary life, the great scientific innovations. And all the knowledge built can be evidenced in the written and visual productions distributed on the murals, contemplating all the spaces of the school and the relevance of the study. However, the very social distancing generated by the pandemic period caused many disruptions in the school routine, among which contacted scientists impossible.  

Find out more here: our report.

News . Events Vaccines-reinforcement of the body’s immunity (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. Participants were 180 students, aged between 14 and 17, from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades of high school, 160 of whom completed the scientific action, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19, especially the functioning of the human immune system and the role of vaccines, a controversial topic from different world and life views.

KNOW: The school curriculum was worked, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, integrating the areas of biology and chemistry in the analysis of historical and scientific data. Clarification was sought about the COVID-19 vaccine in the immunization of the human organism. Cause and effect, prevention and risks are discussed in the context of scientific and popular knowledge, mainly in the ideas arising from family members and the surrounding community. This provided the students’ interaction in the learning process, giving voice to the opinions built in the school, family, and society, analyzing the scientific in collective conversations. The process of teaching and learning by areas of knowledge enabled innovations in learning practices. The interaction of students in the process of unraveling the essence of the object of study motivates the interest in learning the unknown. This learning develops skills because he/she feels subject to this discovery of scientific knowledge. This helps in the perception of problems, as well as in identifying the causes and possible solutions. It was unique to develop the ability to argue in discussions about the vaccine as a reinforcement of the body’s immunity in times of COVID-19. As attitudes, we sought to value scientific knowledge, lead students to analyze and distinguish information about vaccines, scientific from fake news, as well as to enable scientific knowledge built in the school environment for life in society and to understand the function of the vaccine, as a human creation, as a reinforcement of the immunity of the human organism.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities, to develop scientific studies that raise awareness of the quality of life in times of COVID-19.

  • Analyze the historical context of science, scientists and scientific method and their functions and risk in planetary life, through research and presentation to the class.
  • Identify the pathogens (viruses, fungi, protozoa, or bacteria) that cause communicable diseases in epidemics and pandemics with laboratory practices.
  • Understand the function of the vaccine as a reinforcement of the immunity of the human organism.
  • Analyze information and discussions on social networks about the COVID-19 vaccine, differentiating scientific from opinions and fake news.
  • Clarify doubts about the production of vaccines to prevent viral or bacterial diseases.
  • Exhibition of murals at school with flyers about the vaccine and prevention habits against COVID-19.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. The students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families, and it was remarkable how much they didn’t know the subject, at the same time they wanted to learn. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful in this controversial topic during the pandemic, and as the school offers teaching by areas of knowledge, it facilitated the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities targeting technological resources and curricular interaction through of projects.

OUTCOMES: In general, students participated and interacted in learning activities with an interest in learning and discovering curiosities about science. Several students did not know the main scientists and their contributions to planetary life, the great scientific innovations, vaccine advances, especially COVID-19, the functions of science as disease prevention. And all the knowledge built can be evidenced in the written and visual productions distributed on the murals, contemplating all the spaces of the school and the relevance of the study. However, the very social distancing generated by the pandemic period caused many disruptions in the school routine, among which contacted scientists impossible. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in the form of a rotation, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities. On the other hand, some students were not included in the study for reasons. But, in general, the students exceeded expectations in the development of scientific actions. The relevance of this study can be seen in the arguments of the discussions; respect for group opinions; the valorization of scientific knowledge in the solution of problems; to know the origins of science for the understanding of the pandemic, COVID-19 and responsible decision making.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Organic functions of alcohol in times of pandemic (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 180 students, between 14 and 17 years old, from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades of high school, with 162 of them having completed the scientific actions, with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist shared their concerns about the issues of cleaning and contamination, where the power of alcohol can make a difference. Questions about why alcohol, why 70% alcohol, why in the hands, how and why the contagion of COVID-19 occurs, how to prevent it, among others, were questions raised and discussed. The main purpose was to train multipliers students to disseminate the scientific knowledge studied at school to families and the surrounding community.

KNOW: Different activities were developed, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, in ​​Natural Sciences, and with an emphasis on the scientific content of Chemistry, particularly the analysis of data about alcohol in the prevention of COVID-19. In this way, the students became interested in the study, understanding the organic functions of 70% alcohol and its interactions in hygiene and contamination prevention measures. The students participated in carrying out the learning activities, expanding their repertoire of knowledge, based on science. The skills developed address the student’s ability to be a protagonist, acting as multipliers of scientific knowledge in COVID-19 prevention measures, especially speaking with property of how the destruction of the coronavirus happens with the use of alcohol. As attitudes, it was sought to develop the prevention of health and human life; to value the knowledge acquired in the school environment in the practice of the context in which one lives and to argue, with scientific property, in the discussions and practices of the use of alcohol in the prevention of COVID-19.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Analyze hygiene issues in the school, family, and society context as fundamental measures to prevent COVID-19.
  • Contextualize the scientific content with the current situation of COVID-19, in school environments and the safety measures to be taken to preserve everyone’s health and life.
  • Provide experiences on hand hygiene with soap and alcohol to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in the light of laboratory experimentation.
  • Develop in school spaces the skills of being a protagonist in making responsible decisions in the face of COVID-19.
  • Prepare students to be multipliers of correct information about COVID-19 hygiene measures, covering family, school, leisure, social and cultural environments.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. The laboratory experiences made it possible to verify scientific knowledge in practice. The integration of the school curriculum with scientific action enabled new teaching and learning practices. It is observed that both complement each other in the teaching and learning processes.

OUTCOMES: In general, the students actively participated in the proposed activities on the study of alcohol in times of COVID-19. Always interacting with significant questions to expand knowledge through the scientific content of chemistry that guide the benefits and risk of using soap and alcohol in hygiene in the pandemic. It was surprising how the students began to act during and after the study was carried out. The dominance of scientific argumentation among peers was evident. The ability to make responsible decisions in the use of alcohol in hand hygiene in different spaces and places was really developed. It was gratifying to see the change in students’ habits in terms of caring, knowing and doing. However, the very social distancing in the pandemic caused a lot of disruption in the school routine and the return of face-to-face classes with 50% of students reduced the time for carrying out learning activities. Thus, the action did not have direct contact with the scientist as expected.

Find out more here: Our report. 

News . Events Together against Covid-19 (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 47 students, in three classes of 1st year of high school. As a guiding question, the importance of vaccination was worked on to overcome the pandemic of the new coronavirus, together with their families, a teacher, a researcher. Due to the pandemic scenario, it was not possible to have the synchronous participation of experts during the science-action, but activities were developed that sought to involve the family in the debate on scientific issues. To build knowledge and facilitate discussions in the hybrid format, debates were encouraged through virtual learning environments.

KNOW: Interdisciplinary activities were developed, even without the involvement of a biology teacher, for example, when dealing with the importance of vaccination against pandemic diseases, health issues and social well-being. In addition, we worked with the abstract textual genre, its structure and organization. The proposed activities aimed to improve the skills of asking questions, analyzing data, verifying information and sources, weighing arguments, drawing conclusions and sharing ideas. As for the attitudes to be developed, we sought to value public health and social well-being, science and scientific investigation and collaborative work; the notion of collectivity and the consideration of data and information, seeking to verify its reliability, as well as the importance of debate and respect for the collective construction of knowledge.

DO: For the development of this science-action activity, the following activities were carried out:

  • Previous conversation (with slideshow support) about the importance of vaccination, vaccines approved in Brazil and their risks and benefits;
  • Installation of a virtual wall – the Padlet platform was used for this activity;
  • Reading of the selected article, which will be summarized later;
  • Verification and verification of the information presented in the article read;
  • Sharing of sources consulted on the virtual wall;
  • Discussion of researched information and expansion of the repertoire on the topic;
  • Work with the characteristics of the summary genre, with the support of slides;
  • Presentation of the abstract production proposal.
  • Production and sharing of abstracts on the virtual wall.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning, even in a virtual environment. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. The fact that the students had devices that allowed the research and assembly of the virtual wall (smartphones, computers, internet, etc.) was fundamental for the development of the activity. In addition, teamwork also contributed to making the activity more interesting for students. It is essential for the teacher to have more ready-made (or easily adaptable) materials, such as videos, podcasts, slides, graphics, etc., to use as support during classes. The discussions carried out through participatory science contributed to a greater awareness of students about vaccination against the coronavirus, and these were shared with the community through the production of a school summary, which was posted on a virtual wall to facilitate access for students. all.

OUTCOMES: The students really enjoyed the activities, as they stimulate debate on topics that are relevant to them. In any case, the proposed activities were carried out in a collaborative way, which contributed to their engagement. It was interesting to see how the students gradually engaged during the activities, especially the debates. At first, there was some reluctance to participate in the discussions, perhaps for fear of not having their position respected or valued. When they realized that their contributions were accepted and taken into account, more and more students decided to present their positions. The students were very interested in the topics under discussion. In addition, they were critical of the researched data, verifying sources and prioritizing information from scientific studies. It was very gratifying to see how much they liked the activity, requesting that other actions be carried out with the same format. Being a content school, it was not possible to dedicate more classes to the activity, which made some steps to be carried out in a reduced way. For this reason, it was also not possible to involve any professor of Natural Sciences – leaving this question to be adapted in future studies and applications. Due to the pandemic, it was not possible to bring outside experts to the school, so we seek texts with scientific credibility and involve the family in the proposed discussions.

News . Events Obelisk of COVID-19 (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 95 students, between 14 and 16 years old, from the 1st grade of high school, of which 76 completed the scientific actions, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19 and ideas about as the artistic making, especially the construction of obelisks, has its historical and cultural role, in this case, as pictograms representing the care against the contamination of COVID-19, they could compose an obelisk emphasizing the historical and artistic context of the pandemic.

KNOW: Curricular knowledge was worked, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, emphasizing the analysis of historical and scientific data in the disciplines of Art and Science. This made it possible, in a practical way, for students to interact and play a leading role in the learning process: the analysis of cultural heritage in the historical context of humanity; the identification of pictograms in visual communication contextualized with the colors of the traffic light and with Covid-19; exhibition of the study carried out in open spaces at the school and presentation of the artistic productions of the obelisks emphasizing the awareness of the theme addressed were the learning opportunities offered to the students. Quality of life, health, prevention, language and communication, artistic creation, pictograms, colors, cultural heritage of humanity in relation to COVID-29 were the bases of learning.

The ability to relate knowledge with pictograms, to establish relationships between communication, art, and knowledge, were developed through individual and collective practices contemplating the analysis and experiences that addressed the artistic and cultural heritage monuments contextualized with COVID-19. The skills to make responsible decisions to ensure the quality of life in times of a pandemic, as well as the value of human life in/in the world, were also development focuses. As attitudes, it was sought to protect human life; to identify measures to prevent and control the contamination of the coronavirus, to redefine the school curriculum with theories and practices in times of COVID-19, to value the knowledge built in the school environment for life in society and to promote reflections with research at school, family and community about the pandemic in real time.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Analyze Obelisks from Egypt and Brazil, regarding their contributions to the history of humanity and the meaning of the images in the historical, political, social, and cultural context.
  • Contextualize the importance of the “Obelisk” monument in the record of historical facts on the timeline in different spaces.
  • Searching bibliographic sources in real time about COVID-19.
  • Reading of the material available on the prevention and vulnerability of the cities of Santa Catarina, in the pandemic, including the city where the school is located.
  • Understand and interpret the language and communication of pictograms in the context of society as language and communication contextualized with COVID-19.
  • Elaboration and exhibition of the “Obelisk of COVID-19” with pictograms of prevention against coronavirus.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. They learned the artistic language in a contextualized and meaningful way. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful for contextualizing COVID-19 from the perspective of its artistic-cultural and historical representation. The adaptations took place in accordance with the theories and learning practices of the New High School. In general, it fits perfectly into the school curriculum by exploring and complementing actions already developed and based on competences and skills in teaching by areas of knowledge. This facilitated the planning of actions and the applicability of learning activities. Teachers meet weekly and seek theories and practices compatible with the subject addressed, technological resources that expand the possibilities of access to science.

OUTCOMES: The participation of students was significant in carrying out the activities. It was evident that the dialogue between the areas of knowledge was relevant for the engagement, interaction, and production of scientific knowledge. Students felt protagonists in the learning processes. There have been changes in attitudes and habits in relation to care in the prevention of COVID-19 in school, family, and society spaces. It is not always possible to achieve the participation of all, however, it is observed that the number of students who were not included in the learning process is minimal.

The expectations of the students surprised each class, as they eagerly awaited something different to learn about the historical and cultural monuments; the pictograms; the colors most present in the daily lives of people in/of society which are: green, yellow, and red that indicate responsible actions to be taken in traffic and prevention against COVID-19. It was wonderful, the moment that the students were able to make the relationship between Art and Science in real time. The loom in the learning process made it possible to reframe the school curriculum in dialogue with everyday knowledge of students and family members to adapt to the new social and cultural context in times of COVID-19. There was the scientific perception that we are united and interconnected with the universe we live in and subject to changes for the quality of life.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Memes and cartoons: Brazilian way in the Covid-19 pandemic (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 120 students, aged between 14 and 16, from the 1st grade of high school, 78 of whom completed the scientific action, with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19 and ideas for creating memes and cartoons, to contextualize the Brazilian Federal Declaration with the pandemic, highlighting human and citizen rights and duties.

KNOW: They were developed, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, with the school curriculum integrating the disciplines of Sociology and Philosophy in the analysis of historical and scientific data. Thus, it was possible to understand the laws that ensure the right of citizens in times of COVID-19, permeated by the concepts of Citizenship, Citizen, Cultural Identity and Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, in view of the contingency plan proposed for the pandemic.

In the teaching and learning processes, the skills developed addressed the student’s ability to contextualize the rights of the citizen with the reality found in urban spaces with COVID-19, as well as the ability to interpret the laws and make them accessible to everyone who wants to know to improve their quality of life.

As for the attitudes to be developed, we sought to promote empathy to overcome the “chaos” caused by epidemics and pandemics; the appreciation of reflections on the Brazilian Federal Constitution for new approaches to knowledge, in addition to enabling new forms of learning emphasizing social relationships, ethics and respect for life.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Bibliographic research on the subject.
  • Research in documentary sources and images.
  • Analysis of scientific articles on the relationship between the declaration of human and citizen’s rights with the actions and attitudes of the population in the pandemic.
  • Classroom debate on the Brazilian Federal Constitution.
  • Preparation of pamphlets such as memes and cartoons about “how do people act today in the pandemic?” and “How should people act on COVID-19?”
  • Socialization of visual production and reflections punctuated with an emphasis on the pandemic.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful for the Contextualization of the Brazilian Federal Declaration with the pandemic highlighting human and citizen rights and duties. Teaching by area of knowledge facilitated the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities, the use of technological resources and curricular interaction based on integrated projects.

OUTCOMES: The participation, engagement, and interest of students in the development of activities related to citizen rights in the COVID-19 pandemic. It was significant and surprising in the way they adhered to the proposal to know the Brazilian Federal Constitution. Most students did not know the rights of citizens. The relationship between legal laws and the pandemic was discussed with the students, arousing interest in knowing more and engaging in the activities of memes and cartoons presenting the Brazilian way in the pandemic. In a fun way, students were able to express their criticisms they felt about COVID-19.

During the learning activities, the students felt confident about their opinion on the rights of the citizen contextualized with the pandemic. Discussions about the Brazilian Federal Constitution aroused curiosity about the rights and duties of citizens defined by law. It is observed that the students were more confident in their speeches about Politics, Science and COVID-19.

However, the very social distancing generated by the pandemic period caused many disruptions in the school routine, among which they made it impossible to contact scientists or, in this case, jurists or political analysts. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in the form of a rotation, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities. On the other hand, some students were not included in the study for reasons.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Resignifying the spaces of architecture and urbanism in times of COVID-19 (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 104 students, aged between 14 and 16, from the 2nd grade of high school, 78 of them having completed the scientific action, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19. Everyone involved in the action of identifying problematic situations in urban spaces that favor the spread of the virus, inspired by the study of great inventions, especially architectural works, at the time of the Renaissance, in particular the project by Leonardo Da Vinci, “the city of future”, created from the epidemic of the Black Death in Europe.

KNOW: Curricular knowledge was worked, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, emphasizing the analysis of historical and scientific data in the disciplines of Art and Science. This made it possible, in a practical way, for students to interact and play a leading role in the learning process. Research, discussion, and application of concepts on quality of life, health, prevention, art and science, language and communication, architecture and urbanism, pandemic, great inventions of the Renaissance period and model making permeated all the actions of the project.

The skills of reflection, discussion and construction were developed through individual and collective practices contemplating the analysis and experiences that addressed the artistic and cultural heritage monuments contextualized with COVID-19. The result shows the students’ perceptions when speaking with property about the coronavirus, attitudes, and habits to combat contamination in school, family and society and the combative architectural needs in the spread of viruses.

As attitudes to be developed, emphasis was placed on valuing urban spaces; in creating ideas to solve problem situations in architecture and urbanism; to identify preventive measures against COVID-19 in urban spaces; in the act of resignifying the school curriculum with theories and practices in times of COVID-19; the one of valuing the knowledge built in the school environment for life in society and the one of promoting reflections with a scientific nature in the school, family and community on human innovations.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Observation, together with family members, of the urban spaces of the cities and their architectures, identifying the problems encountered (whether in houses, buildings, hospitals, public transport, parks, squares, schools, gyms, among others), which DO NOT offer quality life and protection from COVID-19.
  • Research and discussion in groups about art and science and the great inventions in the renaissance.
  • Reading and interpretation of the 15th century Epidemic, which inspired Leonardo Da Vinci to create the “city of the future” project.
  • Presentation of videos and websites about COVID-19.
  • Construction of a model and presentation of the problem with a possible solution:
  1. Ex: the PROBLEM is in the care of recovery of contaminated patients. How could a new hospital, or park with cozy, welcoming spaces, offer a joyful and harmonious environment with therapeutic medicine to overcome fear, panic, anguish, physical and emotional difficulties?
  2. Ex: the PROBLEM is in public transport. What is the solution to improve public transport since the distance of the seats does not correspond to the distance of 1.00 meters?
  3. Ex: the PROBLEM is in the size of the internal spaces of the house, thinking about work “home office”. What is the innovation of house and apartment projects to meet this new type of work that COVID-19 has caused overnight changes along with digital technology, internet?

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. Teachers found the open learning activity useful and as the school offers teaching by areas of knowledge, it facilitated the planning of actions and the applicability of learning activities. The adaptations took place in accordance with the New High School learning theories and practices. Teachers meet weekly and seek theories and practices compatible with the subject addressed, technological resources that expand the possibilities of access to science. In general, addressing socio-scientific issues fit perfectly into the school curriculum by exploring and complementing actions already developed and based on competences and skills in teaching by areas of knowledge.

OUTCOMES: The participation of students was significant in carrying out the activities. It was evident that the dialogue between the areas of knowledge was relevant for the engagement, interaction, and production of scientific knowledge. Students felt protagonists in the learning processes. There have been changes in attitudes and habits in relation to care in the prevention of COVID-19 in school, family, and society spaces. However, it is not always possible to achieve the participation of all, however, it is observed that the number of students who were not included in the learning process is minimal.

During the making of the model, it was visible that the students embraced the proposal, as they were confident in their ability to think, create and produce. The freedom of creation in the model aroused more interest in the students because they felt subjects in the process. Trust asserts itself when actors identify themselves as protagonists with autonomy in responsible decisions.

However, the very social distancing generated by the pandemic period caused many disruptions in the school routine, among which contacted scientists impossible. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in the form of a rotation, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Language in the journalistic-media field and newspaper literature. (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 96 students, aged between 14 and 16, from the 2nd grade of high school, 20 of whom completed the scientific action, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19. All were involved in the objective of analysis and study actions on the problem of creating a school newspaper, based on media journalism for the dissemination of learning activities carried out during the 2021 school year, especially activities integrated by areas of knowledge, provided for the New High School and actions on COVID-19.

KNOW: Curricular activities were developed, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, between the components of the area of ​​Languages ​​and their Technologies, with an emphasis on the scientific content of Portuguese, English and Spanish, especially in the analysis of the information collected and transformed into media language to be disseminated. in the school newspaper. The responsible decisions of those involved in curating the news to be edited and made public was an essential learning experience. The mastery of what journalistic-media texts is, questions about Science and Technologies, especially the topic of COVID-19, the difference and complementarity between written and visual language and the mastery of digital authoring tools such as Scribus and Adobe Fireworks digital resources anchored the learning in the teaching-learning process.

As skills to be developed in the learning processes, the student’s ability to have decision-making autonomy was addressed in the face of challenges in/of society; to be a subject in the construction of individual and collective knowledge; the resourcefulness of reading, orality and writing and the mastery of digital authoring tools.

Regarding attitudes, the focus was on identifying information and opinion as phenomena, fake news, and post-truth; the valorization of communication in the social and cultural context in the journalistic-media field, as well as improving the practices of curation, organization and dissemination of information to the public, in a critical and ethical way.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Presentation of videos and websites on the field of media-journalism, digital technological resources, and access to a diversity of scientific content.
  • Reading of material available on the role of the media-journalism field in/of society.
  • Investigation of forms of contemporary journalism and identifying the veracity of facts and identifying fake news, post-truth and its effects.
  • Construction of the digital and printed newspaper with learning activities developed in the school environment covering several areas of knowledge.
  • Elaboration and layout of the digital and printed literary newspaper covering what the New High School is and the learning activities that cover the different areas of knowledge that were carried out at the school during the 2021 school year;
  • Printing and dissemination on the newspaper’s social networks for access by families, educational institutions, and the community in general.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Adjustments to the school curriculum happened naturally during the learning process, given the needs and interests of students. Due to the teaching modality that the school offers in the New High School, which is based on the development of skills and abilities by areas of knowledge, it was possible to adjust the learning necessary for the development of the project. As the school offers teaching by areas of knowledge, it facilitated the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities targeting technological resources and curricular interaction through projects.

OUTCOMES: The creation of the newspaper was a valuable idea as a motivation and appreciation for the students to feel themselves actors in the production of knowledge and subject to the curation of information to be published in a media. The students involved participated actively and responsibly in the creation of the newspaper. Always attentive and helpful in the orientation and collection of information based on media journalism. This activity motivated the students to have autonomy and mastery in the writing and layout of news through printed and digital language.

The sparkle in the eyes and the smile on the students’ faces when delivering the printed newspaper was proof that they were satisfied and confident in the work carried out.

The very social distancing caused by the pandemic caused many disruptions in the school routine, which contacted scientists, newspaper editors and even visits to a space for journalistic production impossible. A The return to face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in a rotation way, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events The historical context of epidemics and pandemics (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: Students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan and sought to understand the historical, social, and cultural context of epidemics and pandemics. The participants were 180 students, aged between 14 and 17, from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades of high school, with 162 of them having completed the scientific actions, their family members, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19. and ideas to reduce transmission supported by the Brazilian Federal Declaration of human and citizen rights and duties. Together with family members, students sought to understand and collected information from bibliographic sources about what would be epidemics and pandemics, their differences, in which societies this phenomenon has already happened, when and why. They also sought to raise causes and effects in the social context in different bibliographic sources, especially the ethical challenges of health, economics, politics, and human rights that have become relevant points in decision-making.

KNOW:  In the classroom, the students shared the previous information gathered for the elaboration of a timeline, with spatial location, elaboration of concepts and debates, among other activities. In relation to knowledge, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, the integration of the disciplines of History and Geography in the analysis of historical and scientific data was developed. In this way, it was possible to understand the epidemics and pandemics in the timeline, as well as the location in the geographic space. Knowing when, where and how the historical facts happened in the world was fundamental.

As skills, the student’s ability to contextualize the historical facts of the past was developed to understand the present, as well as predict new alternatives for the future that could solve other pandemics; another skill was to reflect on responsible decision-making with ethics, empathy and their social and cultural relationships.

Due to these actions in the teaching-learning process, it was observed as attitudes, the valorization of historical records for new approaches to knowledge; the possibilities that new forms of learning, in times of a pandemic, promote in social and ethical relationships and respect for life, as well as the promotion of empathy to overcome the “chaos” caused by epidemics and pandemics, through acquired knowledge.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Analyze the history of epidemics and pandemics on the timeline with the current context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Location on maps of countries where some epidemics have emerged;
  • Identify differences and similarities between communicable diseases of the past and the pandemic in the 21st century.
  • Reading of material available in texts, videos and the book “The history of humanity told by viruses”, written by Stefan Cunha Ujvari;
  • Analysis of scientific articles on the social, moral and ethical relationship during pandemic periods;
  • Classroom debate on the topic;
  • Elaboration of concept maps;
  • Documentaries relating to the history of epidemics;
  • Posters or panels with elements referring to pandemics;
  • Exhibition of the historical study with performance of the main epidemics and pandemics that haunted humanity.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful for the Contextualization of the Brazilian Federal Declaration with the pandemic highlighting human and citizen rights and duties.

OUTCOMES: The integration of the school curriculum with scientific action enabled new teaching and learning practices whose adaptations served to improve the development of learning and teaching. School curriculum and scientific action complement each other. The New High School made possible several innovations in the school curriculum and in the form of planning that allows teachers to gather by areas of knowledge, which facilitates the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities, the use of technological resources and curricular interaction based on integrated projects.

The performance presented by the students showed mastery of content on the history of epidemics and pandemics. They embraced the idea and placed themselves as the main character in the story: the different viruses. In this way, the activity instigated and motivated the study as something peaceful and fun.

However, the social distance caused by the pandemic caused many disruptions in the school routine, many changes, which, for example, contacted scientists impossible. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Multi-actor dialogue engaging students and health/science professionals for pregnancy prevention and physical/ mental violence awareness (Best Practice Brazil)

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Care: The socio-scientific issue that the students ‘care about‘ was pregnancy at puberty and violence. Data during the pandemic shows that violence during outbreak increased particularly against women and underrepresented groups.   

Know:  To help young people be more informed during their puberty with ‘knowledge’’, their online  debate was supported by a dialogue focused on students questions, some references shared by experts on the web and informed-based recommendations developed by the participants.    

Do: 300 students interacted with five science professionals, a specialist in menstrual education, a doctor, a psychologist, a nurse and a social worker. The science action focused on an interactive dialogue with inquiry mapping to bring up questions, references and comments in the online discussion using Google Meet platform. 

Findings: The key benefit of open schooling mentioned by students was that the multi-actor dialogue led to greater awareness of teen pregnancy prevention and the forms of physical and mental violence that affect puberty. This initiative had the consent of the parents and created opportunities for dialogue between students and their family. Although this open schooling activity was not integrated into the curriculum, it was supported by teachers.  

Outcome: Youth found the dialogue with professionals useful and listen to what other student think enabled them to increase their interest about the topic. 

Find out more here: Our report. 

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