News . Events I capture through photography the problems of my place and apply solutions

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Care: The planet is facing many problems of different kinds. But often we need to start with the simple problems of our community in order to find sustainable solutions that will last. In this way, we become familiar with the ‘culture of active citizenship’, learn to find solutions, implement them and take a keen interest in our neighbourhood. Every neighbourhood has its own problems, which often apply to the wider context of our city. Thus, the 16 pupils of E2 class of our school decided to deal with the problems of their neighbourhood.

Know: The educational scenario “I capture through photography the problems of my place and implement solutions” aimed to motivate students to connect their knowledge about light, to use the tool of photography, to depict problems of their wider neighbourhood and then, to find solutions, to implement and show them in the form of a multimodal installation.

Do: The students photographed the various problems in their neighbourhood, grouped them together and then found solutions for each one. In particular, they contacted the city’s kennel, interviewed volunteers and in consultation with them collected food for the strays. They then sent a letter to the town hall secretary citing problems with the sidewalk, trash and some large trees in the area. Finally, they made their own leaflets about illegal parking and distributed them in the area. They also made and placed recycling bins in various places (outside the school).
Conclusions on Open Schooling: This project opened the classroom to the local community. The students looked forward to doing the project at different times of the day, as everything they made, wrote and created had a direct impact on their daily lives and was characterized by an actual and concrete “meaning”.

The contact with scientists and community stakeholders was particularly helpful and gave the children added interest.

The change/innovation was supported by:

[ x ] School management [ x ] school association/network
[ x ] Local government [ ] Other: ________________________________

Student results: The students organized a multimodal installation in the classroom and presented in various forms what they did through the project. They made artworks, games, added sound and image to their thoughts and actions. The exhibition seemed “fantastic”, “special” and “interesting” as the visiting parents described it.

This practice contributed to the increase of: the Director of 41th Primary school of Heraklion [ x ] engaging families with sciences [ x ] involving girls in science [ x ] raising awareness among students about careers in the natural sciences

Please specify: All students participated and cooperated. The result was very encouraging for all of us. Girls and boys found motivation and interest in the activities. Parents were delighted with the enthusiasm of their children and worked very well together.

News . Events Integrated approach to scientific research process

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Care: The students wondered about the origin but also the future of the pink sand on the famous and highly touristic beaches of western Crete. A real problem that concerns the local community for reasons both ecological and mainly economic. The question that caught the students’ interest was “what is pink sand and how long will it continue to exist?” They were asked to discuss this question in the form of a questionnaire with their relatives and record their answers. These answers, which highlighted the essential ignorance of the local community about the “pink sand” phenomenon, were investigated in the laboratory and thoroughly discussed in the following months. The students who participated in the activities were students of 1st and 3th grade of High School and mainly of two specific classes of A1 and C1, where I was supporting teacher. The main research core consisted of two mixed age groups with a total of 17 students. Many more students from other departments also participated in the various activities, excursions, briefings and visits, fulfilling to a large extent my expectation to be informed, through participation and to stimulate curiosity about the program, of almost the entire school.

Know: The students used knowledge about single-celled organisms, food webs, the systematic classification of organisms into categories based on how they feed and how they use energy, fossils, marine biodiversity, ecology, human intervention, pollution and contamination, microplastics , mainly knowledge from the field of biology but also physics and chemistry (eg elementary nomenclature of chemical elements).

The skills the students acquired through continuous practice were using a stereoscope and microscope, using laboratory forceps, precision weighing, observing and creating data for analysis, discussing claims and evidence, collaborating both with each other and with research agencies i.e. teamwork. They understood how important the scheduling is in a research process and in general. How conclusions are made and how they are presented to the general public. They experienced media and conference presence and practiced what is called “communicative courage”. Although the skills listed below, are not skills in the strict sense of the term, I believe that self-discipline and self-confidence were successfully practiced especially in the students who “carried the burden” of publicizing our research.

Do: At the end, the students prepared a powerpoint presentation of our research, took micro-photographs and sent material (sand) to Germany where the foraminifera species were identified and entered on the website foraminifera.eu. They completed the activities working as a team under my guidance. Our research work was presented at the student conference organized by the Regional Directorate of Education of Crete and the CONNECT program, while we also presented the topic on a local TV Station. Conclusions on Open Schooling: The activity was not integrated into the timetable or the curriculum exactly. However, it accompanied, and through the research he gave meaning and explained basic material of high school biology, mainly about cells, food webs, the systematic classification of organisms into basic categories based on how they feed and how they utilize energy, fossils, marine biodiversity, ecology, pollution and contamination etc. Apart from these, through the sensitive microscopic organisms we were studying, we dealt with and discussed issues such as climate change and the way it can affect them as well as more generally human intervention and activities such as tourism, while they were given the opportunity to come into contact in practice in terms and concepts such as microenvironment, pseudopods, plasma membrane, indicator organisms, etc.

But, because our work was essentially primary research, the students came into contact with the process of producing new knowledge. They saw the exciting, gratifying and sometimes painful aspects of the research process. The complexity of biological issues and the multitude of factors that need investigation. In other words, they understood experientially the importance of asking questions, organizing them and studying them. They also understood that this is a team effort and that collaboration with other scientists and agencies is absolutely essential. They understood that not everything has been discovered and that not all the answers are in a mobile phone… They saw that scientists do not know everything, that they disagree
and make mistakes (eg at first we thought that the pink grains are broken corals, then there was a disagreement about the how deep the particular foraminifers live). They got a first idea of how important different views and approaches are in science and saw that there are no absolute truths and that biology is full of “exceptions”. They learned the importance of questioning and practiced deductive thinking.

For all the above reasons, I believe that the program was a challenge since it was largely about research in “deep unknown waters”, it was innovative and of course many times useful, mainly because it was understood that science is not something distant but something everyday that deals with ” our own questions” and that we can “use it too”, while also due to the pleasant way in which it was carried out it contributed to the creation of a positive attitude of children towards science and especially biology.

Experiential open schooling education is more than important to escape from the “museum” perception and practice of “transferring” knowledge provided by the Greek school. A common “argument” of the children is “and where will I need all this?”. The teaching material is far removed from the daily life of the students, or at least it seems so since the connection with the daily life is not made and the provided knowledge is not used to solve questions, searches and problems that children have. Practical – experiential and seemingly non-material activities, at least for the field of natural sciences, I think are not only useful but necessary especially at these ages when children should have the opportunity to show off their inclinations, preferences and “talent” and acquire a positive attitude towards science.

For some teachers, these practices may be a problem because they are out of the ordinary and need to be informed and above all to act outside the context in which they have learned. In other words, it needs work. But they ignore the “rejuvenating” effect that these practices have both on the way we as teachers perceive our work and on the relationships with students and parents, which are significantly upgraded. When children get excited about something, they talk about it at home and parents realize if the child goes to school happily.

The change/innovation was supported by:

[ x ] School management [ x ] school association/network
[ x ] Local government [x ] Other: Parents

Student results: The core of students that finally formed after 2-3 weeks were very cooperative, consistent and hardworking. Participation was high from the beginning with few drop-outs, mainly due to other activities at the same time or the bus schedule (many children in our school came from distant villages), but also with new entries “on the way”. And the fact that our meetings were held every Friday, that is, on the last day of the week, after the end of the program clock, and they participated for an hour or two more
shows, that their process was pleasant. Several even came from villages relatively far away and were awake very early in order to come to school.

In the 3 educational trips we carried out (KPE Vammos, Elafonissi and MAICH) many more students participated, so that the cost of transportation could be covered but also because I wanted an expanded participation in general so that our research could be embraced by the whole school. We always combined research with free time and sports, especially at the MAICH where we carried out an important part of our research, since the professional micro-photographs took place there, while overall its facilities were offered for many parallel activities. The goal was of course to make the whole process as pleasant as possible.

I consider this goal to have been achieved. To quote the words of a student: “I hated biology, I was thinking of becoming a philologist, but now I’m thinking of becoming a biologist” or, others, “this is how school should be”, “scientists have a good time”, etc.

In terms of learning outcomes, starting with the simplest ones, eg converting lt to ml, gr to mgr for the needs of weighing. The clarification of the difference in volume and mass, up to specialized knowledge about marine biology, such as:

  • what are foraminifera; they are not shells and which creatures we call shells,
  • what is meant by a decomposer, an autotrophic and a heterotrophic organism,
  • what is the life cycle, and other questions that are difficult to determine since the questions and discussion often arose spontaneously.

This practice contributed to the increase of:
[ x ] engaging families with sciences [ x ] involving girls in science [ x ] raising awareness among students about careers in the natural sciences

  1. The subject of pink sand is something that concerns the daily life of the residents of the area, so there was a relative curiosity from the start anyway. Initially, the opinion of the parents was asked to be recorded, and not only, regarding “what is the reason”, “if there is a decrease in the phenomenon”, “if you think it is in danger of disappearing”. Then some parents who deal with the sea gave us important information and also brought samples very important for our search about where they live (depth distance from the shore) and in what form they are first washed up as pink grains of “sand”. There have been parents who have expressed to me their personal interest and their desire to help in whatever is needed. Also, no one raised an issue or refused to pay when needed for our travel on educational trips. All this shows that the program was accepted and therefore, even just by talking with their children, some parents more or less engaged in science through it.
  2. The girls in our school, and in general I believe, have a better presence in the classroom and in the lessons than the boys, at least on average. Nevertheless, there are stereotypes and prejudices against science and mathematics. Many girls have the opinion that they don’t understand maths, physics or chemistry. The subject of biology, at least in our school, was not very popular. However, slightly more girls than boys participated in the program. Most of the students were hardworking and responsible, participating and asking questions. In my opinion, on the contrary to what they wanted to believe, some of them are, “born researchers”. They were oblivious to the microscope, while being particularly skilled with the tools and inventive in the way they carried out the activities. Through the program inclinations were encouraged and revealed. One student revealed that she liked to observe and photograph spiders, but had never shared it with her friends since “spider observation” is not considered a “female activity”. Along with the foraminifera, we also worked on and identified the student’s spiders, something that the others eventually found interesting as well. The girls enjoyed working with the laboratory and microscopes as well as tinkering with the tweezers. The visit to the Mediterranean Agricultural Institute of Chania (MAICH) where all the research staff we met were female biologists and agronomists, I believe contributed to breaking the convenient stereotypes of female students. However, if I judge from their reaction, the publicity of our research in the media and at the conference
    played a role. Apart from the fact that they want to make their own people happy, girls at this age are very involved with celebrities, social networks and want to project themselves in a corresponding way. They like to have an audience. It is characteristic that both in the presentation at the conference and in our presence on Crete TV, no boy wanted to appear in any way, while most of the girls, on the contrary, wanted to and showed remarkable seriousness and discipline throughout the preparation of the presentation. Our 16-minute appearance in a midday light show of general interest on Crete TV, with TV presenters from the modeling field, was important, I believe, in showing some girls that science and these areas are not completely incompatible after all. How the “beautiful” appreciate and admire science and there is general acceptance and appeal. That various avenues open up through research, which may include publicity. Likewise with the conference, although online, the fact that they will be seen by students from many parts of Greece appealed to the girls, especially since they were convinced of the importance of our work. In conclusion, I believe that the area in which the program was most successful was in relation to girls and their engagement in science.
  3. The reasons I mentioned above also apply to boys. Therefore, as a whole, through a research process, the students came into contact with the real tangible world of natural sciences, which is admittedly if not always exciting, certainly interesting. In summary, I will dare to “predict”, although this also depends on their teachers in the years to come, that this High School will produce natural scientists…

News . Events Landscape and Renewable Energy Sources (RES)

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Care: The students dealt with the issue of the integration of RES in the landscape, a real problem that occupied the students of Tinos in view of the massive installation of wind turbines in the landscape of Tinos. The students who participated in the activities were twenty-eight (28), 14-year-old students of the 2nd Class of the High School.

Know: The students used knowledge about the role and importance of RES considering their rational integration in landscapes and ecosystems, considering their functions and value.

The skills the students practiced were:

  • question processing,
  • data analysis,
  • discussion of claims and evidence,
  • drawing or drawing conclusions,
  • familiarity with the ways and stages of conducting a research,
  • familiarity with techniques for searching, evaluating and presenting information through a variety of sources,
  • development of collaboration, creative expression and presentation skills.

Do: At the end, students put their knowledge into practice by doing field research. A 2-day Educational Visit was made to the landscape of the paths of Andros (in collaboration with KPE Korthiou). The program of the visit included group work in and outside the field, namely: Practical-Experiential Part: hiking, information, observation, photography, exploration and activities, landscape experience with all the senses.

In detail, the practical-experiential part contained:

  • Observation and recording of field characteristics
  • Familiarity with the space through all the senses
  • Perception of space through various games
  • Identification of species of flora (mainly) and fauna
  • Map reading
  • Completing worksheets
  • Presentation of the habitats of Andros and the most important historical stations
  • Discussion about the needs of the people who created the landscape of Andros.

Creative Part: recording of valuable elements and problems of the landscape and ecosystem, discussion related to threats and proposals for better management. The result was a group presentation of the results of all work groups through a powerpoint work, which was presented by student representatives at an event organized by the High School of Tinos at the Spiritual Center of the Holy Foundation of Evangelistria on Thursday 25 May 2022 at 19.00, in which they took part and their parents/guardians. The presentation emerged from the discussions with the scientists in the context of the “learn” section and from the practical-experiential part of the training which included filling in worksheets (of the KPE), individual notes and group discussions.

The parents/guardians of the students who participated in the CONNECT program were informed about its content both in person (those who visited the school) and electronically with frequent messages describing the activities. This ensured as active an involvement as possible them in the whole project (a fact that helped to cultivate the scientific capital). The results of their program were presented extensively at a live event organized by the school.

Conclusions on Open Schooling: The action was not embedded in the curriculum, but indirectly related to it. It was useful and innovative as it related to the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes (as discussed below). Open schooling can also be useful for other teachers because it can combine knowledge and apply it in the field (eg identifying and valuing natural and cultural wealth of an area)..

The change/innovation was supported by:

[ x ] School management [ ] school association/network [ ] Local government [ ] Other: ________________________________

Student results: The students showed interest in the thematic subjects of the program, submitted questions and participated in discussions. They took into account what the scientists conveyed to them and a relationship of trust was cultivated. This was reflected in the results of the action. Notably, there were also examples of relatively weak students showing great interest in the collaborative method and field research and taking initiatives. They responded with particular enthusiasm to the educational visit (outside the island), which was an important motivation for their activation at all levels of thinking and action.

This practice contributed to the increase of:

[ ] engaging families with sciences [ x ] involving girls in science [ x ] raising awareness among students about careers in the natural sciences

Please specify: Parents participated in the collection of questionnaires for the student survey. The girls actively participated in the mapping and literature review and in general all students showed a special interest in digital maps and the contribution of geomorphological terrain to road construction.

News . Events Urban Planning from the perspective of students

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Care: The students dealt with a real problem related to improving the quality of life of the residents of the area where they live. This problem concerned the reconstruction of part of the road network, in order to facilitate the movement of vehicles in accordance with the rules of urban planning. The students who participated in the activities were 12 years old, studying in the 6th grade and totaling 13 members.
Know: The students used knowledge to collect information regarding the history of their place and the road construction of previous years using search engines and the rules of literature review, they used a text editor and statistical analysis software to write their project and analyze the data that collected from the questionnaire they constructed according to research methodology standards on the needs of their village residents. They also used mapping and construction software to observe satellite maps and process them to build models. The skills that the students practiced at a cognitive level were related to sciences such as Statistics (Mathematics), History (Modern History of Greece), Informatics (knowledge & use of Word-Excel),
Visual Arts (model construction). Through these academic subjects which were interdisciplinary combined and interdisciplinary developed, skills were cultivated such as the processing of cognitive content, the ability to distinguish useful information from a multitude of sources, the skills of digital map processing, the skills of strategic planning and mapping, the skills of problem-solving, cooperative learning communication skills, etc.
Do: At the end, the students prepared a presentation of their study and a projection presentation of the entire research process. Websites were posted and they built a mockup with their proposal for the proposed changes to their village’s road network. Their model was donated to the Museum of Cretan Ethnology as a kind gesture of offering to their place. They completed the activities honorably at the level of research and as a team at the level of processing, editing and production supported by their families and members of the local community.
Conclusions on Open Schooling: The activity was integrated into the curriculum. It was useful for the local community, since it solved a functional problem of the village, related to the social issues of the villagers, quite challenging as it was the first time a similar action was taken by students involved in real research conditions and innovative as the students’ proposal was advanced by themselves and acted as a barrier to the progress of their country. Open schooling can be both useful and challenging for other teachers because it will go a long way in familiarizing them with designing cross-curricular and interdisciplinary action plans, although it requires a lot of coordination and consistency in planning to ensure success. A flexible design is proposed that will prevent sudden changes and propose alternative solutions.
The change/innovation was supported by:
[ x ] School management [ x ] school association/network [ x ] Local government [ ] Other: ________________________________
Student results: Students were active and active during the research process. They were consistent in the work they each undertook in their group and seemed to assimilate relatively easily the scientific knowledge they needed to use. Their familiarity with NTs was very helpful in dealing with digital hardware and software. They learned how a scientific study is structured and how it is conducted. They seemed to enjoy the role of researcher to the point of engaging in the tasks of the other groups as well. As an example, one student mentioned “Did you see, ma’am, that I can work in other groups and not just the one I’m in?” Their activation productively cultivated the speech skills of both production and comprehension of oral and
written texts.
This practice contributed to the increase of:
[ x ] engaging families with sciences [ x ] involving girls in science [ x ] raising awareness among students about careers in the natural sciences
Please specify: Parents participated in the collection of questionnaires for the student survey. The girls actively participated in the mapping and literature review and in general all students showed a special interest in digital maps and the contribution of geomorphological terrain to road construction.

News . Events Science action on Health: prevention of Covid.19 at the school supported by participatory research (Best Practice – Spain)

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CARE: The socio-scientific issue was on how to improve the prevention of Covid.19 at the school. The professionals that gave support were the scientific community from Escoles Sentinella project: science communicators, biologists, epidemiologists, paediatricians among others, helping on the facilitation of the participatory research. From an invitation letter to the project and with some previous knowledge explorations the students get fully committed to the project. 

KNOW: As the activities were implemented from the tutoring sessions, the debate competence and also the citizenship education topic (social values content) were the aspects more worked using this CONNECT resource. Despite we did not go in depth with biological issues, the students also learned a lot about how the coronavirus is spread and why do we need those preventions measures to protect everybody from the transmission.  

DO: Students developed communication skills and skills to create, design and edit video, as they chose disseminate their results through a video. Students also developed iinquiry skills, participation skills and transdisciplinary methodologies. The science actions included teamwork, collaborative learning within the class and with other stakeholders and that science useful to solve real-life challenges. 

Findings about open schooling: The activity they did was adapted to the curriculum of Obligatory Secondary Education (ESO) and it was implemented at the tutoring sessions. 

Results for students: Students get more confident on debating and on presenting their own opinions to the group. The activity has led to greater awareness of Covid-19 prevention and how the measures to achieve that can be improved by a participatory research process. 

CONNECT Resources used: LINK 

News . Events Organic functions of alcohol in times of pandemic (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 180 students, between 14 and 17 years old, from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades of high school, with 162 of them having completed the scientific actions, with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist shared their concerns about the issues of cleaning and contamination, where the power of alcohol can make a difference. Questions about why alcohol, why 70% alcohol, why in the hands, how and why the contagion of COVID-19 occurs, how to prevent it, among others, were questions raised and discussed. The main purpose was to train multipliers students to disseminate the scientific knowledge studied at school to families and the surrounding community.

KNOW: Different activities were developed, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, in ​​Natural Sciences, and with an emphasis on the scientific content of Chemistry, particularly the analysis of data about alcohol in the prevention of COVID-19. In this way, the students became interested in the study, understanding the organic functions of 70% alcohol and its interactions in hygiene and contamination prevention measures. The students participated in carrying out the learning activities, expanding their repertoire of knowledge, based on science. The skills developed address the student’s ability to be a protagonist, acting as multipliers of scientific knowledge in COVID-19 prevention measures, especially speaking with property of how the destruction of the coronavirus happens with the use of alcohol. As attitudes, it was sought to develop the prevention of health and human life; to value the knowledge acquired in the school environment in the practice of the context in which one lives and to argue, with scientific property, in the discussions and practices of the use of alcohol in the prevention of COVID-19.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Analyze hygiene issues in the school, family, and society context as fundamental measures to prevent COVID-19.
  • Contextualize the scientific content with the current situation of COVID-19, in school environments and the safety measures to be taken to preserve everyone’s health and life.
  • Provide experiences on hand hygiene with soap and alcohol to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in the light of laboratory experimentation.
  • Develop in school spaces the skills of being a protagonist in making responsible decisions in the face of COVID-19.
  • Prepare students to be multipliers of correct information about COVID-19 hygiene measures, covering family, school, leisure, social and cultural environments.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. The laboratory experiences made it possible to verify scientific knowledge in practice. The integration of the school curriculum with scientific action enabled new teaching and learning practices. It is observed that both complement each other in the teaching and learning processes.

OUTCOMES: In general, the students actively participated in the proposed activities on the study of alcohol in times of COVID-19. Always interacting with significant questions to expand knowledge through the scientific content of chemistry that guide the benefits and risk of using soap and alcohol in hygiene in the pandemic. It was surprising how the students began to act during and after the study was carried out. The dominance of scientific argumentation among peers was evident. The ability to make responsible decisions in the use of alcohol in hand hygiene in different spaces and places was really developed. It was gratifying to see the change in students’ habits in terms of caring, knowing and doing. However, the very social distancing in the pandemic caused a lot of disruption in the school routine and the return of face-to-face classes with 50% of students reduced the time for carrying out learning activities. Thus, the action did not have direct contact with the scientist as expected.

Find out more here: Our report. 

News . Events Together against Covid-19 (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 47 students, in three classes of 1st year of high school. As a guiding question, the importance of vaccination was worked on to overcome the pandemic of the new coronavirus, together with their families, a teacher, a researcher. Due to the pandemic scenario, it was not possible to have the synchronous participation of experts during the science-action, but activities were developed that sought to involve the family in the debate on scientific issues. To build knowledge and facilitate discussions in the hybrid format, debates were encouraged through virtual learning environments.

KNOW: Interdisciplinary activities were developed, even without the involvement of a biology teacher, for example, when dealing with the importance of vaccination against pandemic diseases, health issues and social well-being. In addition, we worked with the abstract textual genre, its structure and organization. The proposed activities aimed to improve the skills of asking questions, analyzing data, verifying information and sources, weighing arguments, drawing conclusions and sharing ideas. As for the attitudes to be developed, we sought to value public health and social well-being, science and scientific investigation and collaborative work; the notion of collectivity and the consideration of data and information, seeking to verify its reliability, as well as the importance of debate and respect for the collective construction of knowledge.

DO: For the development of this science-action activity, the following activities were carried out:

  • Previous conversation (with slideshow support) about the importance of vaccination, vaccines approved in Brazil and their risks and benefits;
  • Installation of a virtual wall – the Padlet platform was used for this activity;
  • Reading of the selected article, which will be summarized later;
  • Verification and verification of the information presented in the article read;
  • Sharing of sources consulted on the virtual wall;
  • Discussion of researched information and expansion of the repertoire on the topic;
  • Work with the characteristics of the summary genre, with the support of slides;
  • Presentation of the abstract production proposal.
  • Production and sharing of abstracts on the virtual wall.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning, even in a virtual environment. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. The fact that the students had devices that allowed the research and assembly of the virtual wall (smartphones, computers, internet, etc.) was fundamental for the development of the activity. In addition, teamwork also contributed to making the activity more interesting for students. It is essential for the teacher to have more ready-made (or easily adaptable) materials, such as videos, podcasts, slides, graphics, etc., to use as support during classes. The discussions carried out through participatory science contributed to a greater awareness of students about vaccination against the coronavirus, and these were shared with the community through the production of a school summary, which was posted on a virtual wall to facilitate access for students. all.

OUTCOMES: The students really enjoyed the activities, as they stimulate debate on topics that are relevant to them. In any case, the proposed activities were carried out in a collaborative way, which contributed to their engagement. It was interesting to see how the students gradually engaged during the activities, especially the debates. At first, there was some reluctance to participate in the discussions, perhaps for fear of not having their position respected or valued. When they realized that their contributions were accepted and taken into account, more and more students decided to present their positions. The students were very interested in the topics under discussion. In addition, they were critical of the researched data, verifying sources and prioritizing information from scientific studies. It was very gratifying to see how much they liked the activity, requesting that other actions be carried out with the same format. Being a content school, it was not possible to dedicate more classes to the activity, which made some steps to be carried out in a reduced way. For this reason, it was also not possible to involve any professor of Natural Sciences – leaving this question to be adapted in future studies and applications. Due to the pandemic, it was not possible to bring outside experts to the school, so we seek texts with scientific credibility and involve the family in the proposed discussions.

News . Events Obelisk of COVID-19 (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 95 students, between 14 and 16 years old, from the 1st grade of high school, of which 76 completed the scientific actions, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19 and ideas about as the artistic making, especially the construction of obelisks, has its historical and cultural role, in this case, as pictograms representing the care against the contamination of COVID-19, they could compose an obelisk emphasizing the historical and artistic context of the pandemic.

KNOW: Curricular knowledge was worked, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, emphasizing the analysis of historical and scientific data in the disciplines of Art and Science. This made it possible, in a practical way, for students to interact and play a leading role in the learning process: the analysis of cultural heritage in the historical context of humanity; the identification of pictograms in visual communication contextualized with the colors of the traffic light and with Covid-19; exhibition of the study carried out in open spaces at the school and presentation of the artistic productions of the obelisks emphasizing the awareness of the theme addressed were the learning opportunities offered to the students. Quality of life, health, prevention, language and communication, artistic creation, pictograms, colors, cultural heritage of humanity in relation to COVID-29 were the bases of learning.

The ability to relate knowledge with pictograms, to establish relationships between communication, art, and knowledge, were developed through individual and collective practices contemplating the analysis and experiences that addressed the artistic and cultural heritage monuments contextualized with COVID-19. The skills to make responsible decisions to ensure the quality of life in times of a pandemic, as well as the value of human life in/in the world, were also development focuses. As attitudes, it was sought to protect human life; to identify measures to prevent and control the contamination of the coronavirus, to redefine the school curriculum with theories and practices in times of COVID-19, to value the knowledge built in the school environment for life in society and to promote reflections with research at school, family and community about the pandemic in real time.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Analyze Obelisks from Egypt and Brazil, regarding their contributions to the history of humanity and the meaning of the images in the historical, political, social, and cultural context.
  • Contextualize the importance of the “Obelisk” monument in the record of historical facts on the timeline in different spaces.
  • Searching bibliographic sources in real time about COVID-19.
  • Reading of the material available on the prevention and vulnerability of the cities of Santa Catarina, in the pandemic, including the city where the school is located.
  • Understand and interpret the language and communication of pictograms in the context of society as language and communication contextualized with COVID-19.
  • Elaboration and exhibition of the “Obelisk of COVID-19” with pictograms of prevention against coronavirus.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. They learned the artistic language in a contextualized and meaningful way. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful for contextualizing COVID-19 from the perspective of its artistic-cultural and historical representation. The adaptations took place in accordance with the theories and learning practices of the New High School. In general, it fits perfectly into the school curriculum by exploring and complementing actions already developed and based on competences and skills in teaching by areas of knowledge. This facilitated the planning of actions and the applicability of learning activities. Teachers meet weekly and seek theories and practices compatible with the subject addressed, technological resources that expand the possibilities of access to science.

OUTCOMES: The participation of students was significant in carrying out the activities. It was evident that the dialogue between the areas of knowledge was relevant for the engagement, interaction, and production of scientific knowledge. Students felt protagonists in the learning processes. There have been changes in attitudes and habits in relation to care in the prevention of COVID-19 in school, family, and society spaces. It is not always possible to achieve the participation of all, however, it is observed that the number of students who were not included in the learning process is minimal.

The expectations of the students surprised each class, as they eagerly awaited something different to learn about the historical and cultural monuments; the pictograms; the colors most present in the daily lives of people in/of society which are: green, yellow, and red that indicate responsible actions to be taken in traffic and prevention against COVID-19. It was wonderful, the moment that the students were able to make the relationship between Art and Science in real time. The loom in the learning process made it possible to reframe the school curriculum in dialogue with everyday knowledge of students and family members to adapt to the new social and cultural context in times of COVID-19. There was the scientific perception that we are united and interconnected with the universe we live in and subject to changes for the quality of life.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Memes and cartoons: Brazilian way in the Covid-19 pandemic (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 120 students, aged between 14 and 16, from the 1st grade of high school, 78 of whom completed the scientific action, with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19 and ideas for creating memes and cartoons, to contextualize the Brazilian Federal Declaration with the pandemic, highlighting human and citizen rights and duties.

KNOW: They were developed, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, with the school curriculum integrating the disciplines of Sociology and Philosophy in the analysis of historical and scientific data. Thus, it was possible to understand the laws that ensure the right of citizens in times of COVID-19, permeated by the concepts of Citizenship, Citizen, Cultural Identity and Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, in view of the contingency plan proposed for the pandemic.

In the teaching and learning processes, the skills developed addressed the student’s ability to contextualize the rights of the citizen with the reality found in urban spaces with COVID-19, as well as the ability to interpret the laws and make them accessible to everyone who wants to know to improve their quality of life.

As for the attitudes to be developed, we sought to promote empathy to overcome the “chaos” caused by epidemics and pandemics; the appreciation of reflections on the Brazilian Federal Constitution for new approaches to knowledge, in addition to enabling new forms of learning emphasizing social relationships, ethics and respect for life.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Bibliographic research on the subject.
  • Research in documentary sources and images.
  • Analysis of scientific articles on the relationship between the declaration of human and citizen’s rights with the actions and attitudes of the population in the pandemic.
  • Classroom debate on the Brazilian Federal Constitution.
  • Preparation of pamphlets such as memes and cartoons about “how do people act today in the pandemic?” and “How should people act on COVID-19?”
  • Socialization of visual production and reflections punctuated with an emphasis on the pandemic.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful for the Contextualization of the Brazilian Federal Declaration with the pandemic highlighting human and citizen rights and duties. Teaching by area of knowledge facilitated the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities, the use of technological resources and curricular interaction based on integrated projects.

OUTCOMES: The participation, engagement, and interest of students in the development of activities related to citizen rights in the COVID-19 pandemic. It was significant and surprising in the way they adhered to the proposal to know the Brazilian Federal Constitution. Most students did not know the rights of citizens. The relationship between legal laws and the pandemic was discussed with the students, arousing interest in knowing more and engaging in the activities of memes and cartoons presenting the Brazilian way in the pandemic. In a fun way, students were able to express their criticisms they felt about COVID-19.

During the learning activities, the students felt confident about their opinion on the rights of the citizen contextualized with the pandemic. Discussions about the Brazilian Federal Constitution aroused curiosity about the rights and duties of citizens defined by law. It is observed that the students were more confident in their speeches about Politics, Science and COVID-19.

However, the very social distancing generated by the pandemic period caused many disruptions in the school routine, among which they made it impossible to contact scientists or, in this case, jurists or political analysts. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in the form of a rotation, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities. On the other hand, some students were not included in the study for reasons.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Resignifying the spaces of architecture and urbanism in times of COVID-19 (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 104 students, aged between 14 and 16, from the 2nd grade of high school, 78 of them having completed the scientific action, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19. Everyone involved in the action of identifying problematic situations in urban spaces that favor the spread of the virus, inspired by the study of great inventions, especially architectural works, at the time of the Renaissance, in particular the project by Leonardo Da Vinci, “the city of future”, created from the epidemic of the Black Death in Europe.

KNOW: Curricular knowledge was worked, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, emphasizing the analysis of historical and scientific data in the disciplines of Art and Science. This made it possible, in a practical way, for students to interact and play a leading role in the learning process. Research, discussion, and application of concepts on quality of life, health, prevention, art and science, language and communication, architecture and urbanism, pandemic, great inventions of the Renaissance period and model making permeated all the actions of the project.

The skills of reflection, discussion and construction were developed through individual and collective practices contemplating the analysis and experiences that addressed the artistic and cultural heritage monuments contextualized with COVID-19. The result shows the students’ perceptions when speaking with property about the coronavirus, attitudes, and habits to combat contamination in school, family and society and the combative architectural needs in the spread of viruses.

As attitudes to be developed, emphasis was placed on valuing urban spaces; in creating ideas to solve problem situations in architecture and urbanism; to identify preventive measures against COVID-19 in urban spaces; in the act of resignifying the school curriculum with theories and practices in times of COVID-19; the one of valuing the knowledge built in the school environment for life in society and the one of promoting reflections with a scientific nature in the school, family and community on human innovations.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Observation, together with family members, of the urban spaces of the cities and their architectures, identifying the problems encountered (whether in houses, buildings, hospitals, public transport, parks, squares, schools, gyms, among others), which DO NOT offer quality life and protection from COVID-19.
  • Research and discussion in groups about art and science and the great inventions in the renaissance.
  • Reading and interpretation of the 15th century Epidemic, which inspired Leonardo Da Vinci to create the “city of the future” project.
  • Presentation of videos and websites about COVID-19.
  • Construction of a model and presentation of the problem with a possible solution:
  1. Ex: the PROBLEM is in the care of recovery of contaminated patients. How could a new hospital, or park with cozy, welcoming spaces, offer a joyful and harmonious environment with therapeutic medicine to overcome fear, panic, anguish, physical and emotional difficulties?
  2. Ex: the PROBLEM is in public transport. What is the solution to improve public transport since the distance of the seats does not correspond to the distance of 1.00 meters?
  3. Ex: the PROBLEM is in the size of the internal spaces of the house, thinking about work “home office”. What is the innovation of house and apartment projects to meet this new type of work that COVID-19 has caused overnight changes along with digital technology, internet?

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. Teachers found the open learning activity useful and as the school offers teaching by areas of knowledge, it facilitated the planning of actions and the applicability of learning activities. The adaptations took place in accordance with the New High School learning theories and practices. Teachers meet weekly and seek theories and practices compatible with the subject addressed, technological resources that expand the possibilities of access to science. In general, addressing socio-scientific issues fit perfectly into the school curriculum by exploring and complementing actions already developed and based on competences and skills in teaching by areas of knowledge.

OUTCOMES: The participation of students was significant in carrying out the activities. It was evident that the dialogue between the areas of knowledge was relevant for the engagement, interaction, and production of scientific knowledge. Students felt protagonists in the learning processes. There have been changes in attitudes and habits in relation to care in the prevention of COVID-19 in school, family, and society spaces. However, it is not always possible to achieve the participation of all, however, it is observed that the number of students who were not included in the learning process is minimal.

During the making of the model, it was visible that the students embraced the proposal, as they were confident in their ability to think, create and produce. The freedom of creation in the model aroused more interest in the students because they felt subjects in the process. Trust asserts itself when actors identify themselves as protagonists with autonomy in responsible decisions.

However, the very social distancing generated by the pandemic period caused many disruptions in the school routine, among which contacted scientists impossible. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in the form of a rotation, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Language in the journalistic-media field and newspaper literature. (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: The students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan. The participants were 96 students, aged between 14 and 16, from the 2nd grade of high school, 20 of whom completed the scientific action, along with their families, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19. All were involved in the objective of analysis and study actions on the problem of creating a school newspaper, based on media journalism for the dissemination of learning activities carried out during the 2021 school year, especially activities integrated by areas of knowledge, provided for the New High School and actions on COVID-19.

KNOW: Curricular activities were developed, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, between the components of the area of ​​Languages ​​and their Technologies, with an emphasis on the scientific content of Portuguese, English and Spanish, especially in the analysis of the information collected and transformed into media language to be disseminated. in the school newspaper. The responsible decisions of those involved in curating the news to be edited and made public was an essential learning experience. The mastery of what journalistic-media texts is, questions about Science and Technologies, especially the topic of COVID-19, the difference and complementarity between written and visual language and the mastery of digital authoring tools such as Scribus and Adobe Fireworks digital resources anchored the learning in the teaching-learning process.

As skills to be developed in the learning processes, the student’s ability to have decision-making autonomy was addressed in the face of challenges in/of society; to be a subject in the construction of individual and collective knowledge; the resourcefulness of reading, orality and writing and the mastery of digital authoring tools.

Regarding attitudes, the focus was on identifying information and opinion as phenomena, fake news, and post-truth; the valorization of communication in the social and cultural context in the journalistic-media field, as well as improving the practices of curation, organization and dissemination of information to the public, in a critical and ethical way.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Presentation of videos and websites on the field of media-journalism, digital technological resources, and access to a diversity of scientific content.
  • Reading of material available on the role of the media-journalism field in/of society.
  • Investigation of forms of contemporary journalism and identifying the veracity of facts and identifying fake news, post-truth and its effects.
  • Construction of the digital and printed newspaper with learning activities developed in the school environment covering several areas of knowledge.
  • Elaboration and layout of the digital and printed literary newspaper covering what the New High School is and the learning activities that cover the different areas of knowledge that were carried out at the school during the 2021 school year;
  • Printing and dissemination on the newspaper’s social networks for access by families, educational institutions, and the community in general.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Adjustments to the school curriculum happened naturally during the learning process, given the needs and interests of students. Due to the teaching modality that the school offers in the New High School, which is based on the development of skills and abilities by areas of knowledge, it was possible to adjust the learning necessary for the development of the project. As the school offers teaching by areas of knowledge, it facilitated the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities targeting technological resources and curricular interaction through projects.

OUTCOMES: The creation of the newspaper was a valuable idea as a motivation and appreciation for the students to feel themselves actors in the production of knowledge and subject to the curation of information to be published in a media. The students involved participated actively and responsibly in the creation of the newspaper. Always attentive and helpful in the orientation and collection of information based on media journalism. This activity motivated the students to have autonomy and mastery in the writing and layout of news through printed and digital language.

The sparkle in the eyes and the smile on the students’ faces when delivering the printed newspaper was proof that they were satisfied and confident in the work carried out.

The very social distancing caused by the pandemic caused many disruptions in the school routine, which contacted scientists, newspaper editors and even visits to a space for journalistic production impossible. A The return to face-to-face classes with 50% of the students, in a rotation way, reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events The historical context of epidemics and pandemics (Best Practice Brazil)

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CARE: Students were involved in the discussion about the COVID-19 contingency plan and sought to understand the historical, social, and cultural context of epidemics and pandemics. The participants were 180 students, aged between 14 and 17, from the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades of high school, with 162 of them having completed the scientific actions, their family members, a teacher, a researcher, and a scientist who shared their concerns about COVID-19. and ideas to reduce transmission supported by the Brazilian Federal Declaration of human and citizen rights and duties. Together with family members, students sought to understand and collected information from bibliographic sources about what would be epidemics and pandemics, their differences, in which societies this phenomenon has already happened, when and why. They also sought to raise causes and effects in the social context in different bibliographic sources, especially the ethical challenges of health, economics, politics, and human rights that have become relevant points in decision-making.

KNOW:  In the classroom, the students shared the previous information gathered for the elaboration of a timeline, with spatial location, elaboration of concepts and debates, among other activities. In relation to knowledge, in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary way, the integration of the disciplines of History and Geography in the analysis of historical and scientific data was developed. In this way, it was possible to understand the epidemics and pandemics in the timeline, as well as the location in the geographic space. Knowing when, where and how the historical facts happened in the world was fundamental.

As skills, the student’s ability to contextualize the historical facts of the past was developed to understand the present, as well as predict new alternatives for the future that could solve other pandemics; another skill was to reflect on responsible decision-making with ethics, empathy and their social and cultural relationships.

Due to these actions in the teaching-learning process, it was observed as attitudes, the valorization of historical records for new approaches to knowledge; the possibilities that new forms of learning, in times of a pandemic, promote in social and ethical relationships and respect for life, as well as the promotion of empathy to overcome the “chaos” caused by epidemics and pandemics, through acquired knowledge.

DO: Students were involved in the following activities:

  • Analyze the history of epidemics and pandemics on the timeline with the current context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Location on maps of countries where some epidemics have emerged;
  • Identify differences and similarities between communicable diseases of the past and the pandemic in the 21st century.
  • Reading of material available in texts, videos and the book “The history of humanity told by viruses”, written by Stefan Cunha Ujvari;
  • Analysis of scientific articles on the social, moral and ethical relationship during pandemic periods;
  • Classroom debate on the topic;
  • Elaboration of concept maps;
  • Documentaries relating to the history of epidemics;
  • Posters or panels with elements referring to pandemics;
  • Exhibition of the historical study with performance of the main epidemics and pandemics that haunted humanity.

FINDINGS: The open scenario methodology used was project-based collaborative learning. Students brought their own questions, discussed with the scientists and their families. Teachers found the open teaching activity useful for the Contextualization of the Brazilian Federal Declaration with the pandemic highlighting human and citizen rights and duties.

OUTCOMES: The integration of the school curriculum with scientific action enabled new teaching and learning practices whose adaptations served to improve the development of learning and teaching. School curriculum and scientific action complement each other. The New High School made possible several innovations in the school curriculum and in the form of planning that allows teachers to gather by areas of knowledge, which facilitates the planning of actions, the applicability of learning activities, the use of technological resources and curricular interaction based on integrated projects.

The performance presented by the students showed mastery of content on the history of epidemics and pandemics. They embraced the idea and placed themselves as the main character in the story: the different viruses. In this way, the activity instigated and motivated the study as something peaceful and fun.

However, the social distance caused by the pandemic caused many disruptions in the school routine, many changes, which, for example, contacted scientists impossible. The return of face-to-face classes with 50% of the students reduced the time for carrying out the learning activities.

Find out more here: Our report.

News . Events Climate change and pollution (Best Practice Greece)

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CARE: The students successfully presented key questions for the continuation of the scenario.

KNOW: The main objective of the activity was to engage in a participatory research project to develop strategies for the prevention and control of Covid-19 (and other similar infectious diseases) and also to investigate how it is possible to build themselves a sensitive device to detect and study aerosols indoors using an Arduino microprocessor.

DO: The students prepared articles and presentations related to the issue that concerned them. The success of the children was the correct scientific research through articles that they presented to scientists, as well as the completion of the practical part of the scenario that concerned the design of the carbon dioxide sensor.

Findings: This initiative had the consent of parents and opened opportunities for dialogue with the family, students, and teachers.

Outcomes:  In addition, it gave the students the opportunity to escape from sterile theoretical knowledge and to think outside the box of curriculum, which gave them confidence. The children acquired a positive attitude towards research topics. It was very important for them to realize that research starts from everyday concerns.

News . Events Global Warming and Chemical Pollution: OPEN SCHOOLING IN GREECE (Best Practice Greece)

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CARE: A list of questions was sent to the scientist and through his presentation on the Webex Meet platform where answered.

KNOW: The school curriculum was satisfactorily connected with the chosen topic to work with. The greenhouse effect is integrated in their curriculum and was highly connected with the global warming issue. Discussion supported by participatory science has led to greater awareness of global warming and chemical pollution and provoked actions to confront and eventually solve these issues. It also changed the up to that point indifferent attitude of some of the pupils towards scientific methodology and science in general, to clear interest and positive attitude to science.

DO: Since we used an open scenario approach the students either found themselves sources or used some, we offered them. In this context they developed videos, presentations, and a game.

FINDINGS: This initiative had the consent of the parents and opened opportunities for dialogue with the family, pupils and teachers. After the appropriate modifications was integrated in the curriculum making the scientific approach a handy tool for the pupils to understand scientific methodology and to a certain degree apply it.

RESULTS FOR STUDENTS: The students who participated seem now more confident with science, they really enjoy science lessons and they have increased interest in scientific approach and problems.

1)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGXgNx3U9gM

2)https://pantou.sites.sch.gr/connect/%CE%A1%CF%8D%CF%80%CE%BF%CE%B9%20%CF%84%CE%BF%CF%85%20%CE%B5%CE%B4%CE%AC%CF%86%CE%BF%CF%85%CF%82.pdf

3)https://pantou.sites.sch.gr/connect/%CE%A1%CF%8D%CF%80%CE%BF%CE%B9%20%CF%83%CF%84%CE%BF%20%CE%88%CE%B4%CE%B1%CF%86%CE%BF%CF%82-1.pdf

4)https://pantou.sites.sch.gr/connect/%CE%98%CE%AD%CF%81%CE%BC%CE%B1%CE%BD%CF%83%CE%B7%20%CE%BA%CE%B1%CE%B9%20%CF%87%CE%B7%CE%BC%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%AE%20%CF%81%CF%8D%CF%80%CE%B1%CE%BD%CF%83%CE%B7%20on%20Scratch.html

News . Events Creating & using maps for problem-solving: open schooling with open scenario in Greece (Best Practice Greece)

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CARE-KNOW-DO: The scenario follows the structure of Connect: CARE-KNOW-DO and the methodology of participatory science. Students & teachers are participating in all stages, scientists & parents at the stages of “Care” and “Do”, local authorities at “Do” level. The role of the scientist (University of the Aegean, Geography department) was quite critical as at the first level of “Care” he gave initiatives to students in order to start over the process of creating their digital map and at the third level of “Do” where he assisted students on how to present their results, how to make proposals, to discuss in total student’s investigations and to reply to any student’s question about this map creation. The role of teacher is to support students in all stages and motivate them for their personal growth, for further investigating, to encourage them for spatial thinking etc. The role of parents is to communicate, participate, assist, and help students with their questions/actions as they have an active role during this process.

Outcomes: The outcome of this scenario was a variety of student’s spatial questions which are forwarded to local community for further actions and investigation. For example: environmental pollution, accessibility & proximity issues, promoting local places that are not known yet, bad roads/buildings condition, lack of spatial interactions, lack of basic infrastructure etc. The initial limitation of this scenario was the reluctancy of participation as students/their parents haven’t faced something similar before; after the completion of this scenario all students requested to have similar projects for action to other study fields.

Findings: Another benefit of this scenario was that it took place during pandemic as all students were online and they could participate with scientist meetings. Scientist intrigued student’s mind and of course broaden the knowledge for cartography and the use of maps in daily life. The fulfilment of both cartography labs led students to working in teams, to resolving problems, to spatial thinking, to be more tech-savvy and generally to encourage students for improvement. Overall, there was a great cooperation among everyone, and the scenario implementation was in benefit of all the participants.

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